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Giving Children Access to Print Materials Improves Reading Performance

What impact, if any, does access to print materials have on our children's reading? In an unprecedented, near-exhaustive search uncovering 11,000 reports and analyzing 108 of the most relevant studies, children's book lending and ownership programs were shown to have positive behavioral, educational, and psychological outcomes.

Children's Access to Print Materials and Education-Related Outcomes

The study, Children's Access to Print Materials and Education-Related Outcomes, was commissioned in September 2010 by Reading Is Fundamental, the largest children's and family nonprofit literacy organization in the United States, and conducted by Learning Point Associates, a nonprofit education research and consulting organization and affiliate of American Institutes for Research.


Our overview highlights the results of the meta-analysis on children's book lending and ownership programs.

Read the full meta-analysis. Adobe PDF Icon

Jim Lindsay
Joining Lindsay, from left, are former U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley, President and Chief Executive Officer of Reading Is Fundamental Carol Rasco, Chief Executive Officer of Reach Out And Read Earl Phalen, and Director of Instructional Technology Services of Richland County (South Carolina) School District and RIF Coordinator Ida Thompson.

Jim Lindsay, senior researcher at Learning Point Associates, an affiliate of American Institutes for Research, takes the podium at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on September 21, 2010, to discuss his research showing the positive impact of book distribution programs on children’s educational development. Lindsay reached his conclusion after reviewing more than 11,000 research reports to find the most rigorous and relevant studies of the topic. Reading Is Fundamental commissioned the project.

 

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