Skip main content and go to side content

Where am I?

Retaining Teacher Talent

Report 3. Convergence and Contradictions in Teachers’ Perceptions of Policy Reform Ideas

What do teachers who perceive themselves to be effective believe will improve overall teacher effectiveness?

Teacher Perceptions of Policy Options

Requiring New Teachers to Spend Much More Time Teaching in Classrooms Under the Supervision of Experienced Teachers

What Teachers Say

What Researchers Say

Research on the impact of the duration or quality of student teaching experiences (in which teacher candidates teach lessons under the supervision of a cooperating teacher) on teacher effectiveness is currently insufficient to draw conclusions; however, there is evidence that more weeks of student teaching leaves teachers feeling better prepared (Westat, 2000). In addition, analyses of the Schools and Staffing Survey show that more extensive practice teaching and emphasis in pedagogy in coursework is related to reduced new teacher attrition (Boe, Cook, & Sunderland, 2006). In terms of new teachers of record, having access to high-quality mentorship experiences as part of comprehensive induction programs also improves retention (Ingersoll & Kralik, 2004), but there are few studies that rigorously investigate the impact of expert mentorship on teacher effectiveness, and those that have been conducted have focused on particular programs. A recent randomized control trial showed no difference in teacher effectiveness outcomes in terms of student achievement gains for teachers who participate in a comprehensive induction program versus those who receive prevailing induction support (Isenberg et al., 2009), but study critics contend that variation in implementation confounded the findings (New Teacher Center, 2009).


 

Making It Easier to Terminate Ineffective Teachers

What Teachers Say

What Researchers Say

Organizational researchers found that organizations that do not actively address poor performance send a message to employees that there are low or unique standards for performance, which in turn diminishes motivation and incentives to perform effectively (Daley, 2008; O’Reilly & Weitz, 1980). Economist Eric Hanushek (2008) argues that if the bottom 5 percent of teachers in terms of their contributions to student achievement test scores were removed from the classroom, overall student achievement would increase dramatically based on several as yet untested assumptions. More positively, new research shows that having effective peers makes teachers more effective (Jackson & Bruegmann, 2009).


 

<< Previous | Next >>

Go back to main content | Go back to main navigation

Go back to main content | Go back to main navigation

Go back to main content | Go back to main navigation