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List of Activities and Programs

The following list provides a brief description of each activity or program that met the criteria for high-quality complementary learning. Also highlighted are up to three major types of capital that each program emphasizes for its students. To learn more about each program, click on "Read More."

Learning Enrichment Activities Program (LEAP)
Minnesota Correctional Facility, Red Wing, MN
Capital: Social, Polity, Personal

The Learning Enrichment Activities Program (LEAP) involves two diverse groups of students—juvenile offenders and developmentally delayed children—who both reap immense benefits from the program. Once a week, residents from the correctional facility visit residents at Vasa's Children Home, where they play board games together, help with arts and crafts projects, participate in team sports, throw parties, and become friends. Both groups build social capital and polity capital by learning about people who are different from themselves. The development of personal capital is essential for both these groups. Residents at the correctional facility build personal capital by having the opportunity to interact with others to develop social skills, experience empathy for others, organize and participate in recreational activities, and give back to the community. Vasa residents develop personal capital by experiencing situations that are outside their comfort zones and participating in new activities.

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Techbridge
Oakland, CA
Capital: Human, Personal, Social

Techbridge is a multifaceted program designed to encourage girls in science, technology, and engineering. It is conducted through afterschool and summer programs in Oakland, California, and surrounding communities. The program actively engages students with hands-on activities such as design challenges, electronic kits, and solar-powered building blocks. In addition, the program promotes student leadership through public speaking exercises, opportunities to present to peers and adults, and other venues. Participants' human capital is increased through field trip to worksites, job-shadowing opportunities, and classroom visits by role models. The girls learn from experts in the field. Social capital is further increased by community partnerships with universities, businesses, and other organizations that work together for community outreach and to address the underrepresentation of females in science and engineering. The girls involved in the program also demonstrate an increase in their personal capital. Teachers and parents report that the girls demonstrate leadership in other venues, and evaluation results from a participating high school show that more than 90 percent of the graduating Techbridge girls have gone to choose majors in technology, science, or engineering in college.

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Sunrise Program
Bok Technical High School, Philadelphia, PA
Capital: Financial, Cultural, Human

Bok Technical High School, located in inner-city Philadelphia, serves students who are two or more years behind in reading and mathematics. Through a series of Sunrise Activities, which follow the standards and benchmarks of the Bok Technical High School and the School District of Philadelphia, students have the opportunity to engage in both school-day and afterschool hands-on experiential learning that leads to career development. Students are engaged across a broad spectrum of academic, vocational, and social competencies that raise aspirations, improve educational outcomes, and promote career decisions and lifelong learning. Some of the specific clubs include Construction, Cosmetology, Drama, and Robotics. Each club promotes human capital as the students learn from experts in the field. The Construction Club also emphasizes financial capital. Students have to do research, develop individual plans and flowcharts, order materials, coordinate with vendors and inspectors, write in a journal, advertise, solicit funds, and apply for scholarships and grants in order to rehabilitate a house. The Drama Club focuses on cultural capital as students learn to do research, read and write plays, develop skits, study parts, and contribute as a team in the delivery of each performance module.

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Native Youth Club
Multi-Cultural Center of Sioux Falls, Sioux Falls, SD
Capital: Cultural, Human, Social

The Native Youth Club meets weekly in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Tribal elders teach students about Native American customs, while high school volunteers mentor younger students. Participants represent more than 10 Native American tribes. They build cultural capital by learning the traditional arts of bead work, shawl making, grass dance costumes, medicine wheels, and story telling from the elders. A different tribe is highlighted each week. By learning from their elders, students learn human capital as they listen and keep various traditions alive. The Native Youth Club provides an opportunity for students to expand their social capital by allowing their elders to serve as a resource to them throughout their lives. Students showcase traditional Native American dances at local ethnic celebration. They demonstrate their knowledge and growth to the community, thereby increasing their social capital.

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Computers4Kids
Charlottesville, VA
Capital: Social, Human

Computers4Kids is an afterschool technology mentoring and independent learning program for low-income youth. The program uses computers as a catalyst for youth to challenge themselves, become engaged in their own learning, and realize greater possibilities academically, professionally, and for their community. To help build the social capital of the students, Computers4Kids provides computers in low-income homes and helps students learn how to use the technology. The program also uses human capital through local volunteers who mentor the students involved.

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Living Legacy Program
Marquette Elementary School, Chicago, IL
Capital: Social, Personal

Students from Marquette Elementary School on the Southwest Side of Chicago regularly visit a local senior living center to foster community and school relations and connect diverse generations. Throughout the school year, the students read to the seniors and the seniors read to the students. The two groups play educational games together to help break the ice and get to know each other better. Students increase both their personal and social capital by engaging in an interview project that culminates at the end of the school year. Students interview the seniors and then develop a brochure that highlights the seniors' biographies complete with pictures. Students build social capital by learning from an older generation and their life experiences. In addition, the youth gain personal capital as evidenced by an increase in test scores and increased participation as well as by building a positive relationship with a community member.

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Sioux City Community Schools Afterschool Program
Sioux City, IA
Capital: Social, Polity, Personal

The Sioux City Afterschool Program in Sioux City, Iowa builds several forms of capital in its participants. Through its partnerships with over 50 private businesses and community organizations that provide programming for the students each year, the program develops social capital and makes students aware of the resources around them. A strong character education program develops personal capital within the students as they learn more about and strengthen their own assets and skills. An active youth council that plans activities and engages in community service projects promotes polity capital in the fourth- and fifth-grade participants.

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After School and Summer Enrichment for Elementary School-Aged Youth
Boys & Girls Harbor Inc., New York, NY
Capital: Personal, Social, Health

Boys & Girls Harbor Inc. operates After School and Summer Enrichment for Elementary School Aged Youth in three East Harlem locations in New York City. The program provides a variety of activities that fall into the following domains: academic enrichment, art and culture, health and fitness, youth development, and an assortment of field trips to area attractions. Students build personal capital by having the opportunity to participate in a variety of activities: small-group tutoring and homework help, swimming and lifetime sports, creative writing, visual arts, music, drama and dance, design, discussion groups, and field trips. Several community organizations and businesses participate in programming, providing students with access to other resources and increasing their social capital. Building health capital is a large component of the program. Students develop an awareness of health and fitness through nutrition, physical fitness, self-awareness, and self-respect. The problems of peer pressure and the dangers of drug, alcohol, and tobacco abuse also are emphasized.

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Far-Out Field Trips
Lights On in Lander, Lander, WY
Capital: Social, Human, Cultural

During the course of each summer, students in Lander, Wyoming, have the opportunity to participate in weekly project-based field trips that provide extra learning opportunities focused on Wyoming history. The field trips include hands-on activities that in corporate the core areas of social studies, science, and language arts. Students build social capital by learning more about their community and the multiple resources available, such as the National Historic Trails Interpretative Center, operated by the Federal Bureau of Land Management. Local experts teach the students about their area of expertise, thereby demonstrating human capital to the students. Students gain cultural capital in multiple ways through the field trips. They learn about the history of their region, state, and the United States through the study of American westward expansion. After the field trips, students engage in projects that may include art, writing, sewing, or cooking, which expands their knowledge of various cultural activities.

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Kids Involved in Community Kindness
Alternatives Inc., Hampton, VA
Capital: Polity, Personal

The Kids Involved in Community Kindness (KICK) program provides students the opportunity to identify a neighborhood problem, develop an action plan, and implement a project to help make a difference in their neighborhood. Students engage in various activities, such as journal writing, Internet research, games, interviews, creative writing, and walking tours. Participants increase their polity capital by exploring policies or more complex issues as they identify the root cause of issues relevant to them. This type of service learning engages students with key leaders in the community and introduces them to the effects of laws and policies on community life. The program also allows students to increase their personal capital by giving them the opportunity to engage in collaborative learning; practice reading and writing skills through research, interviewing, and journal writing; and demonstrate increased responsibility to complete tasks required for project completion.

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Sonoma SERVES
Santa Rosa, CA
Capital: Health, Personal, Social

Sonoma SERVES (Students Engaged in Relevant Volunteerism in Educational Settings) afterschool program works directly with students in south Santa Rosa, California. Many of the students are English language learners. The area has high crime rates, gang presence, and poverty. To deal with these factors, the program focuses specifically on academics, issues of language and culture, and conditions of poverty. The project is designed to build student skills through project-based learning. Students build health capital and personal capital through life skills programs. A process called Tribes provides students with the means to manage their own behavior, address conflict, and build connections with each other and the school community. Sonoma SERVES builds social capital in its students and their families by providing parent nights and a Parent University. Parent University involves a series of workshops on communication strategies, information about gangs and violence, healthy decision making regarding drugs and alcohol, college preparation, and the developmental stages of adolescence.

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Philadelphia Academy of Performing Arts
Philadelphia, PA
Capital: Cultural, Human, Social

The Philadelphia Academy of Performing Arts targets students in economically impoverished areas who would not normally have the opportunity to receive quality performing arts training. Students build cultural capital by choosing a theme and then relating it to dance, drama, art, and music. Past topics include fairy tales, bullying, and the Harlem Renaissance. Approximately 250 parents, family members, friends, and students have attended each production. Participants' human and social capital are further developed through opportunities offered by the program. For instance, students have the opportunity to work with and learn from professional artists. Students visit art museums, and they learn how to use community resources such as the library and movies for research purposes.

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Writer's Guild
Gadsden, AL
Capital: Personal, Cultural

Students come together to read and write at the Writer's Guild in Gadsden, Alabama. This program is designed to allow students the opportunity to enjoy the works of various authors while creating their own stories and illustrations. Students build personal capital by becoming avid readers and learning about character education through the chosen texts. The texts demonstrate how to make good choices and inspire students to work toward positive future goals. The program's main objective is to provide students the opportunity to read, comprehend, and write their thoughts on paper on at least a weekly basis. The program intentionally builds cultural capital in participating students by selecting monthly thematic units. For example, during February, Writer's Guild celebrates the lives of African-American authors and discusses how they overcame their struggles in life. The themed units expand into other areas of the afterschool program.

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Mosaic Youth Ensemble
Detroit, MI
Capital: Cultural, Personal, Human

The Mosaic Youth Ensemble of Mosaic Youth Theatre gives students the opportunity to write plays, compose music, and design and build a set. Students gain cultural capital by being involved in all production aspects of a play. Often, the plays they perform relate to a particular moment in history. For example, to celebrate Detroit's 300th birthday in 2001, the students researched and performed a play about Detroit in the 1940s. Students learn how to manage time, develop relationships, and cultivate a sense of professionalism. Their personal capital grows even further as their self-esteem increases due to the responsibilities they are given and the relationships they build with their staff. The Mosaic Youth Ensemble infuses human capital into the program by providing students with the opportunity to work with directors and professional actors, writers, musicians, and designers with the expectation that their work meets college standards. Staff and outside experts provide students with career and college counseling. The program serves the community by presenting a full season of plays and concerts.

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Youth Councils
The Children's Aid Society, New York City, NY
Capital: Polity, Personal

The Children's Aid Society's Youth Councils in New York City are designed to foster youth leadership skills and to give youth a voice in their community. Students build personal capital and polity capital by participating in a democratic governance process and by addressing issues selected by the students that impact their communities. Youth Council members, elected by their peers, provide input and feedback regarding the activities in the afterschool program, organize social events for the afterschool program, and develop and participate in community service and youth advocacy projects. Projects are chosen by the Youth Council and are centered on diverse community issues. The projects initiated by the Youth Councils build leadership capacity in the participants by helping them become adept at working with others, taking initiative, making decisions, planning, organizing, and public speaking.

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Cabrini Connections
Chicago, IL
Capital: Personal, Human

The major goal of Cabrini Connections is to increase the personal capital of students living in Chicago’s Cabrini-Green public housing project by supporting the students' growth and development as they progress through school. Students participate in activities that focus on increasing their self-image, confidence, and motivation to seek higher goals. They develop human capital as they work one-on-one with volunteer mentors and tutors. The mentors and tutors focus on helping the students build communication skills, work on problem solving, and develop thinking skills. They try to open doors for students through writing programs, technology programs, and arts programs.

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Amory Afterschool Program
Amory, MS
Capital: Health, Social

The Amory Afterschool Program builds social capital in its students by collaborating with community members, families, and churches in rural Amory, Mississippi. After the school day, several churches open their doors to students who would not be able to stay at school-based programs because of transportation or other barriers. A highlight of the program is the physical fitness program, which builds health capital in students. The physical fitness program includes nursing, nutrition, health programming, and fitness.

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Community Learning Center (CLC) Videography
Shelburne Middle School, Staunton, VI
Capital: Human, Financial

In Staunton, Virginia, a comprehensive videography program that teaches students all aspects of professional video production was created from a 21st Century Community Learning Center grant at Shelburne Middle School. This program provides students with long-term, hands-on activities where the focus is on doing and experimenting. Students have opportunities to build human capital by learning from subject-matter experts in a variety of disciplines, including teachers in their school and other schools, studio personnel at the local TV and public broadcasting stations, professors and college students in the fields of communications and media, and business professionals in the media. Students also learn the value of financial capital. Recently, they produced a video that foreshadowed the demise of the afterschool program. As a result, the city council immediately allocated $43,000 in emergency funds to sustain the program.

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