Teacher Recruitment and Retention Data Tool

The TQ Center interactive data tool allows you to extract valuable, customized information related to recruitment and retention of teachers across schools, districts, states, and regions. TQ Center recruitment and retention data are based on the 2007–08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics and the Common Core of Data (CCD) also from the U.S. Department of Education.

After you click on a question below, the next page will prompt you to choose the information you wish to show in your comparisons. Your choices will then generate a customized graph.

Questions

1. How many teachers were newly hired by districts for the 2007-08 school year?
  This question explores the number of new teachers that districts hired for the 2007-08 school year.
 
2. Of the districts that dismissed teachers or did not renew contracts based on poor performance, what was the experience level of the teachers they dismissed?
  This question provides evidence on how many districts dismissed teachers and sorts those data by teachers' experience level.
 
3. What percentage of districts have collective bargaining or meet-and-confer agreements with a teachers' union or association?
  This question allows you to view the percentage of districts that have a teachers union or similar bargaining unit in place and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.
 
4. What is the yearly base salary districts typically offer teachers with a bachelor's degree and no teaching experience?
  This question allows you to examine the salaries that districts typically offer to teachers with a bachelor's degree but no teaching experience and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.
 
5. What is the yearly base salary districts typically offer teachers with a bachelor's degree and 10 years of teaching experience?
  This question allows you to view the average salary that districts typically offer to teachers with a bachelor's degree and 10 years of teaching experience and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.
 
6. What is the yearly base salary districts typically offer teachers with a master's degree and no teaching experience?
  This question allows you to view the average salary that districts typically offer to teachers with a master's degree and no teaching experience and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.
 
7. What is the yearly base salary districts typically offer teachers with a master's degree and 10 years of teaching experience?
  This question allows you to view the average salary that districts offer to teachers with a master's degree and 10 years of teaching experience and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.
 
8. What is the yearly base salary districts typically offer teachers at the highest step on the salary schedule?
  This question allows you to view the normal yearly base salary that districts offer to teachers who are at the highest possible step on the salary schedule and explore differences by district location, size, and student poverty levels.

TQ Center uses data from the 2007–08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics.

Over 47,000 U.S. public school teachers completed the SASS teacher survey in the 2007–08 school year. SASS uses a complex stratified sampling design to report accurately for the nation and for each state at an affordable cost. But, SASS is not a census; it does not count every teacher. Therefore, the numbers and percentages SASS reports are estimates of what a census would tell us. Like all surveys, SASS estimates have a margin of error. The TQ Center data section facilitates the exploration of these rich data, nationally, by region, and for each state. The TQ Center always show the margins of error of each estimate.