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Retaining Teacher Talent

Report 3. Convergence and Contradictions in Teachers’ Perceptions of Policy Reform Ideas

What do teachers who perceive themselves to be effective believe will improve overall teacher effectiveness?

Teacher Perceptions of Policy Options

Improving Professional Development Opportunities for Teachers

What Teachers Say

What Researchers Say

After reviewing approximately 1,300 research studies, Yoon, Duncan, Lee, Scarloss, and Shapley (2007) found only nine studies that rigorously investigated the causal link between professional development programs and student achievement outcomes. The studies largely showed positive results, depending on the type of professional development teachers received. Teacher self-report data show, however, that high-quality professional development can have the ability to change how teachers practice and their perceived quality of teaching (Garet, Porter, Desimone, Birman, & Yoon, 2001). The National Staff Development Council reviewed the evidence regarding the characteristics of professional development most likely to improve teacher effectiveness: It must be sustained, intensive, and focused on the work of teaching and student learning (Wei, Darling-Hammond, Andree, Richardson, & Orphanos, 2009).


 

Increasing Teacher Salaries to Levels Similar to Other Professional Jobs
Such as Lawyers and Doctors

What Teachers Say

What Researchers Say

Although it is not possible for researchers to demonstrate a direct correlation between teachers’ salaries and student achievement test scores, an indirect relationship appears to exist. There is consensus within the research community that effective teachers are the single most important school-level factor leading to increased student outcomes. Meanwhile, there is ample research to show that teacher recruitment and retention are improved when teachers’ salaries are more comparable with those in other professions (Borman & Dowling, 2008; Dolton, 2006; Guarino, Santibañez, & Daley, 2006), and some research indicates that pay compression at the top of the salary schedule may have led to the decline of teacher quality since 1960 (Hoxby & Leigh, 2004).


 

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